Anti-vaxxer Meryl Dorey leader calls on followers to storm hospitals during coronavirus lockdown

Anti-vaxxer Meryl Dorey leader calls on followers to storm hospitals during coronavirus lockdown thumbnail
Anti-vaxxer Meryl Dorey (pictured) called on her 13,000 followers to storm hospitals during the coronavirus lockdown An anti-vaxxer who has outrageoysly claimed the coronavirus pandemic is 'fake' has called on her thousands of followers to storm hospitals and breach social distancing laws.Meryl Dorey, co-leader of the Australian Vaccination Network (AVN), took to social media to tell…

Anti-vaxxer Meryl Dorey (pictured) called on her 13,000 followers to storm hospitals during the coronavirus lockdown 

An anti-vaxxer who has outrageoysly claimed the coronavirus pandemic is ‘fake’ has called on her thousands of followers to storm hospitals and breach social distancing laws.

Meryl Dorey, co-leader of the Australian Vaccination Network (AVN), took to social media to tell her 13,000 followers they are ‘being lied to about the deadly coronavirus’.

The advice to break self-isolation rules has been slammed by healthcare officials who have called it ‘dangerous’ and ‘illegal’. 

Anti-vaxxers worldwide have called the coronavirus pandemic a hoax and called on their members to not adhere to government laws, despite more than 55,301 deaths worldwide and scientific evidence showing that the virus is very much real.

‘Are you being lied to? If you are out an about in the next couple of days, why don’t you take your phones and pop into the local hospital. Let us know how crowded it is – or is not,’ Ms Dorey wrote on Facebook.

‘Is coronavirus really overwhelming our nation or is our nation overwhelming us with lies and killing our economy and us?’

Along with her post, Ms Dorey shared a video by fellow American anti-vaxxer Dana Ashlie, who put together clips of her followers questioning paramedics and hospital staff about how many patients with coronavirus they have treated. 

America has surpassed Italy and China in coronavirus infections and more than 5,000 deaths. 

Ms Dorey  shared a video by fellow American anti-vaxxer Dana Ashlie (pictured), who put together clips of her followers questioning paramedics and hospital staff about how many patients with coronavirus they have treated

WHY ANTI-VAXXING IS DANGEROUS 

Immunisation is an effective way of protecting people from harmful, contagious diseases.

Before vaccination campaigns in the 1960s and 70s, diseases like tetanus, diphtheria and whooping cough killed thousands of children.

Immunisation also protects the whole community, preventing the spread of the disease – known as ‘herd immunity’. 

Vaccination can cause a disease to die out altogether – as was the case when smallpox was eradicated in 1980 after a vaccination campaign led by the World Health Organisation. 

Vaccination rates are at over 93 per cent for five-year-olds in Australia. 

Source: Australian Department of Health 

Recently arrived overseas travellers arrive at the Crown Promenade Hotel in Melbourne, Sunday, March 29, 2020

Ms Dorey’s followers pointed out some ‘suspicious’ sightings since the outbreak and said they were planning to go to hospitals to question the coronavirus pandemic.

‘So quiet on Melbourne roads. No sign or sounds of ambulances overburdened with the sick. Very suspicious,’ one person wrote. 

‘We heard a lot of sirens and choppers for a couple of weeks. Since about 3 days ago nothing,’ another commented. 

‘Our local hospital emergency was so quiet we went in, treated and home in just over an hour. Never had that before! someone else wrote. 

‘I plan to do just that! My local hospital is looking pretty quiet and I’m not seeing or hearing ambulances where’s the pandemic? Oh, sorry, of course, the lock down stopped it,’ another wrote. 

‘Went to Liverpool NSW hospital today and emergency room was empty. Two people in the waiting room. which is the least I’ve ever seen there,’ someone wrote.

Ms Dorey’s followers pointed out some ‘suspicious’ sightings since the outbreak and said they were planning on going to hospitals to question the coronavirus pandemic

John Dwyer, a critic of the anti-vaxxers, said there could be an increase of contact-to-contact infection of the coronavirus if people were to break the social distancing rules.

‘We don’t want people going out at all except for essential purposes,’ he told the Gold Coast Bulletin

‘This advice is not just putting (people) in danger because they are stupid, the whole purpose of our social distancing is to stop transmission from one person to another.

CORONAVIRUS CASES IN AUSTRALIA: 5,493

New South Wales: 2,493

Victoria: 1,085

Queensland: 900

Western Australia: 422 

South Australia: 396 

Australian Capital Territory: 91 

Tasmania: 80

Northern Territory: 26

TOTAL CASES:  5,493

DEAD: 28

‘People who ignore it, they are a risk to the whole community and now we are at our most dangerous phase where we have community spread without contact with travellers.’

Ms Dorey hit back at Mr Dwyer’s comments saying she suggested her followers ‘pop over’ to hospitals when they’re walking past. 

‘I see no reason why it would be considered illegal for them to pass by the hospital on their way out or back?’ she responded

‘From everything I have been told, many hospitals have empty or nearly empty car parks. So where are all the COVID-19 sufferers?’  

Australia currently has 5,350 positive coronavirus cases and a total of 28 dead.

Expert modelling of the virus by scientists shows the greatest impact on its spread is ‘the most severe of social distancing measures’. 

Strict social distancing rules have been brought in, preventing people from leaving their homes for non-essential activities. 

Rates of infection have dropped in recent days, with just a 9.4 per cent increase in cases on Sunday, compared to 26.2 per cent on March 22, in the first signs the coronavirus curve may be flattening.

Health Minister Greg Hunt said on Tuesday the slowdown was a ‘significant achievement’.

‘That’s an achievement to which all Australians have contributed,’ Mr Hunt said in Canberra.

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